The Bible Said There’d Be Days Like This

The Bible Said There’d Be Days Like This

My Facebook account was disabled on April 3rd, Holy Saturday. After 13 years, 5,000 friends, and over 7,000 followers, they pulled the plug on me. The excuse is that I violated “community standards.”

I received this on April 3rd and have not been able to access my account.
I received this on March 31st. Apparently, I wasn’t obedient.

I don’t think Zuck liked my most recent post about the number of deaths and injuries caused by this bioweapon. I am entertaining the thought that the COVID Operation is a biological attack in addition to being a psychological attack. I think this “virus” is real in that there are biological agents that have been released purposely and are causing illness and for the most vulnerable, death. I also think these so-called “vaccines” make up the centerpiece of this biological attack. These vaccines also are bioweapons and likely far more damaging than the so-called “virus” itself. According to Dr. Judy Mikovits, these experimental jabs could kill 50 million Americans. Dr. Sherri Tenpenny not only agrees with that figure but adds that many injured by the injections would wish they were dead. Of course, you won’t hear from these doctors in the mainstream news.

My Last FB Profile Pic. With a face like that how could I violate?

The global oligarchs are out to kill us with a manufactured virus and its cure. A one-two punch. The masks, social distancing, vax pressure, and relentless fear porn from all of our institutions including the church, education, governments, and especially the controlled media, is the psychological attack. We are now for the most part, a bunch of simpering, muzzled, media-fed morons who have lost all ability to think for ourselves.

I shouldn’t be so harsh on my fellow humans. This is in the end, a spiritual attack. Satan is a smart fella. Smarter than 95% of evangelical leaders who say they will get the injection and 89% of them will instruct their parishioners to do the same. Not in that number is one of the last true Christian pastors, Dr. Chuck Baldwin, who calls this COVID scam “the most evil hoax ever perpetrated on the human race.”

I stand proudly with Pastor Baldwin. As he points out, this is the Tribulation, the rise of the antichrist, and humanity is under a cloud of massive deception. Pastor Baldwin writes:

The devilish powers that manufactured the phony Covid pandemic used fear and intimidation to coerce people—especially Christian people—to accept mandatory mask-wearing as a precursor to coercing them into accepting the Orwellian (or should I say antichrist) vaccine passports.

As I have said repeatedly, I will say again: The entire Covid narrative—including mandatory masks, social distancing, forced lockdowns and now vaccines and vaccine passports—is a totalitarian tool of the spirit of antichrist as a launching pad for global enslavement. The entire Covid narrative mirrors to a T the warnings of John the Revelator regarding the identifying marks of antichrist.

If the demonic powers promoting this narrative are allowed to have their way, we will not be able to work, travel, buy or sell without a vaccine passport. Even a Bible-reading fifth grader can understand the antichrist nature of such tyranny. So, why can’t evangelical pastors?

He goes on to answer his own question regarding the Mark of the Beast. The problem is the phony belief in the “Rapture” coupled with Christian Zionism.

But the fact of the matter is that the evangelical church has been lying down and tolerating almost every imaginable evil for the past half century or longer. Why? Largely because of the false “Rapture” doctrine of Darby and Scofield. And the false Rapture doctrine is predicated upon their false doctrines of Zionism.

In my series of five messages (on one DVD) entitled The Rise Of The Beast: Coronavirus And Antichrist, there is a message entitled The Scofield Rapture: A False Escape From The Beast. I urge readers to watch it.

Acceptance of Scofield’s fallacious Rapture theory has tranquilized the thinking and sedated the spirit of evangelicals. It has convinced them that any act resembling the spirit of antichrist—no matter how vile—must not be real, because they have not been “raptured” to heaven yet. They have been brainwashed into believing that all things antichrist must always be future; that they will only occur during a future Israel-based “tribulation.”

As a result of this strong devilish deception, the evangelical church has lost its saltiness (Matthew 5:13); and evangelical pastors and so-called Christian leaders by the tens of thousands have become vassals of the kingdom of antichrist.

My denomination, the Presbyterian Church (USA), has fallen in lockstep with the Covidian Cult. Recently, my presbytery encouraged pastors to take pictures of themselves “getting the jab” and to post the photos on social media so their parishioners will comply. Most of the churches in my denomination have not even met in person in over a year. In a document about “reopening” this guideline was offered:

Keeping a log of every person who enters our facilities, when they were there, and where they sit. The log should include names and contact numbers.  The article suggests labeling pews and assigning seats or table numbers.  The log should be maintained for at least three weeks.

Having an individual or staff person identified to maintain registration logs. This person may be the logical choice to be the point of contact with local health authorities.

Seriously? Report all worshipers to the government. Thankfully, I attend worship at a church with no masks, no distancing, no vaccine pushing, and no fearful nonsense. I have been attending regularly for about ten months and I have found it to be the most important thing I do each week for my spiritual, emotional, and physical health.

I used to think Satan was a mythological figure and that the Book of Revelation had already come to pass symbolically in the first century. I no longer think that way. The Tribulation that Revelation and the Gospels reveal is real and is just beginning.

The persecution has already begun with truth-telling doctors, journalists, scholars, and other courageous writers being censored, de-platformed, banned, ridiculed, “disabled”, and slandered. It will get worse before it gets better.

The Good News is that it will get better. Christ is Risen. Christ will not be mocked. Christ will bring home his own.

Loving the Hell out of Us

Here is the text of the sermon I preached on Sunday, February 10th for Evolution Sunday.

“…we can…think of the end of our present life not as the end of our journey with God but simply as the beginning of its next phase. If so, we can conceive that divine grace, working entirely through the attractive power of love, might sanctify us all. There would be no need for the divine violence of casting sinners into hell. God would, instead, love the hell out of us.”
–David Ray Griffin, Two Great Truths: A New Synthesis of Scientific Naturalism and Christian Faith

Loving the Hell out of Us

I am the product of my parents. My father has a mind for science. My mother had a heart for faith. That isn’t to say that my father doesn’t have a heart nor my mother a mind. It is merely my perception of them to make a story about my life. My parents are far more complicated and interesting than the categories I create for them.

Nevertheless, it is with love and respect that I draw from the two of them an ongoing love for science and for faith, a lovers’ dance, two very different ways of knowing and of loving the world into which we are thrust.

Each day as I break a new personal record of consecutive days alive and breathing, I find myself negotiating my parents’ legacy in my own life. Science and faith. A love for facts and discovery. A desire to follow the will of God.

At times the lovers get snippy with each other, insisting that each’s own way is superior. True enough, one way is better at another in some things. Each way is also blind to its own shadow. Each way can also be blind to outside forces that manipulate each toward more sinister agenda.

Science is almost always used for the material of war.
Faith is almost always used for the emotion of war.

Each glimpses how the other is manipulated but that clarity often vanishes in the mirror.

The challenge to me and to us is how science and faith can contribute to the good. If science and faith are both ways of seeking what is true, is it too much to ask of both disciplines to seek also what is good? One of the historic principles of Presbyterian Church Order emphasizes both truth and goodness. You find this paragraph from the 18th century in our Book of Order:

F-3.0104 Truth and Goodness
That truth is in order to goodness; and the great touchstone of truth, its tendency to promote holiness, according to our Savior’s rule, “By their fruits ye shall know them.” And that no opinion can either be more pernicious or more absurd than that which brings truth and falsehood upon a level, and represents it as of no consequence what a [person’s] opinions are. On the contrary, we are persuaded that there is an inseparable connection between faith and practice, truth and duty. Otherwise it would be of no consequence either to discover truth or to embrace it.

These old Presbyterians were talking about truth that comes from faith, but that did not exclude truth that comes from reason. Both ways of knowing truth are in order to goodness. Of course, determining what is good as is determining what is true requires work, conversation, public debate, research, failure, humility, perseverance, and the ability and willingness to respond to change with corresponding change of mind and heart.

When I arrived at Southminster four years ago, a frequent question was asked of me: “What is your vision? What do you think Southminster should do?” My response then was that I didn’t know. I am new. We will have to see what Spirit presents to us.

Many times these types of questions are asked in terms of strategy and marketing. How do we brand ourselves and so forth? I am not against strategy, marketing, and branding, I suppose. But it must take a distant second to content. Who are you? What is real? What is God calling us to be and do? Truth and Goodness first. Strategy, Marketing and Branding, second.

I like this quote  [mis] attributed to Charles Darwin, whose birthday, we celebrate on the Sunday closest to his birthday as Evolution Sunday.

“It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.”

No one likes change, of course. Especially, churches. We all know the old jokes, such as the seven last words of the church:

“We’ve never done it that way before.”

I am going to mention this morning two types of changes that would behoove us to be responsive.

First, some religion. Jesus preaches a sermon. The boys are washing their fishing nets. Jesus tells the boys to drop the nets in the deep water. Simon, who later Jesus calls Peter, the rock upon whom I will build my church, is resistant to this new idea. It sounds like something that has been tried and has failed in the past. Those are the other seven last words of the church:

“We tried it that way once already.”

Simon goes with that one and says to Jesus:

“Master, we’ve been hard at it all night and haven’t caught a thing. But if you insist, I’ll lower the nets.”

Of course, the story concludes with a huge catch of fish and a moral from Jesus:

“Remember this lesson friends, when we go to catch the big fish.”

Here is the question:

“Does Peter, the Rock, represent the church in his resistance to change or in his responsiveness to Jesus?”

I will let that question hang there. You answer it yourself.

One more piece of religion. That is the quote from David Ray Griffin from his book, Two Great Truths: A New Synthesis of Scientific Naturalism and Christian Faith. The question is how does the world end? Not just the world, the galaxy, the universe, the cosmos? Does it end with divine violence, sending sheep and goats to their separate areas? Or does it end through the lure of love? Griffin says, and I agree with him, that the end is the process. God’s work is not complete by sending sinners to hell. God’s work is complete by loving the hell out of us.

In the end, no matter how many lifetimes it takes,

“All will be well.”

With all of that hope, let’s tackle some change.

The first change is that many churches in America are closing.

A friend sent me this article this morning in Baptist News. The article by Pastor Elizabeth Mangham Lott is entitled, “My seminary has closed. But churches are closing too, and it’s time to face some hard questions.”

This is true for Presbyterians as well as Baptists. Our denomination, or its antecedents in 1965 numbered four million. Today about 1.5 million. I am sure that Craig Butler, Southminster member, and treasurer of our presbytery, would be happy to educate us on trends within our own presbytery.

Rather than blame each other, we can ask some hard questions. How do we respond to this change? The article concludes with excellent advice:

“How will we know which path is ours to take? Well, that’s something I did learn in seminary. We sit in holy quiet together, embracing ancient practices of contemplation and discernment. We follow the threads across ancient texts and look for the ways God has always been finding new and wildly imaginative avenues to know and be known by a people. We foster honest, brave, healthy, truth-telling communities that step even more fully and boldly into their calling as followers on the Way of Jesus. We ask really good questions and listen to each other in hopes of getting to even better ones.”

The second change is a far bigger change. It dwarfs the first change in magnitude almost making the first seem irrelevant. But actually, how we respond to the first change will enable us to be better equipped at responding to this second change.

I have spoken of this second change often and from different angles for over twenty years. I haven’t talked about it every Sunday, but I think you know it. And you mostly don’t like it.

Here it is: Americans make up 5% of the world’s population and consume 25% of the world’s resources. Another way to put it is this: If the rest of the world consumed as much as Americans consumed we would need four planets of resources. We have one planet. This is the case when I first started talking about it 20 years ago. It is an inequity that is unsustainable and can only be sustained temporarily through violence.

This change will likely be good for the rest of the world when America stops consuming a quarter of the world’s resources and instead consumes what is proportional to its population. This change will be uncomfortable for Americans when this standard of living changes.

Whether one thinks that inequity is justifiable or not, inequities always result in change. There is always a re-ordering eventually. Evolution happens when species outstrip their environments or when environments change. Whether we come about this question by studying Peak OilClimate Change, or militarization and its accompanying propaganda, there are hundreds of ways to show that these inequities exist and are not going to last. Those inequities are the inequity of human population vs. planetary limits and the inequity of the elites of the world vs. the rest.

This change can come abruptly or gradually or in a combination. As humans in general and Americans in particular, collectively reach the end of our credit limit, and nothing has been done in the past twenty years that I have been talking about it in regards to changing our course, major changes likely will come sooner than later.

Now remember. It is all good.

Simon Peter, the rock of the church, was in the end, responsive to change and Jesus will love the hell out of us.

If my parents taught me anything it is that life ends. My mother lived to be 91. My father is 100 currently. Even long lives end. Given that something will kill us someday, how do we live now?

Do we live to make ourselves as comfortable as possible for as long as possible? That is one way. But there is another way: the way of Jesus. The way of Mohammad. The way of Moses. The way of Buddha. These spiritual leaders knew that life was bigger than themselves and they were all responsive to change.

How might we be responsive to change? I think the fire drill is a great start about being responsive and prepared.

What about snowstorms? Are we as a church responsive enough to that in regards to care for the building but also care for members?

Let’s go bigger.

You have heard that we are due for an earthquake (New YorkerAtlantic). I have not talked about that at all with the congregation in any organized way. Dick Burnham and I were talking about it the other day. A very small percentage has done any awareness or preparation for this.

For me the physical preparation is important, but more than that, the internal preparation is equally as important as is the social preparation.

Change is coming. It comes in many ways. Practicing responsiveness through education, internal spiritual preparedness, and social connection can put Southminster in a place where it can be a helper rather than irrelevant, or worse, a burden. This goes for the congregation as a whole as well as individuals within it.

This is what I do. I am not some slick marketer who can come in and tell you how to get young people in the church, or sing and dance to soft hits of the 80s. I find most of that stuff to be a bunch of bull. I can however tell you what I think is going on and help open discussions on how we might respond, theologically, ethically, and practically to changes that are coming.

Truth and Goodness.

March 10th after church we start with some conversations about what it means to be the church on Denney and Hall in Beaverton.

You can talk to me over pie for breakfast on Wednesdays at Sharis on Allen and Murray or coffee Tuesday mornings. Or whenever. I will leave you today with Charles Darwin (although likely a misquotation):

It is not the strongest of the species that survives,
Nor the most intelligent,
But the one most responsive to change.

Amen.

A Gracious Heretic: Catching Up With Connie Tuttle

Connie Tuttle tells her story of being a queer prophet.

Connie Lee Tuttle is the pastor of Circle of Grace, a small, progressive, ecumenical, feminist, Christian house church in Atlanta, Georgia. She graduated from Columbia Theological Seminary on a path to ordination within the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) She was refused ordination because she is a lesbian. (The denomination has since changed its policies).

In her book, A Gracious Heresy: The Queer Calling of An Unlikely Prophet, she recounts her story, calling herself “slumgullion”, army brat, and third culture kid. She brings it altogether in a story of grace, stumbling, and seeking what is true and good, often outside the box.

She writes at ConnieTuttle.com

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